Baslow Edge with Stags and Hairy Coos

Baslow Edge with Stags and Hairy Coos

Baslow Edge with Stags and Hairy Coos

Would you like to go on a walk filled with exciting animal-spotting opportunities, parkour practice and dizzying heights? Then Baslow edge may be the walk for you.

On a crisp, autumnal Sunday afternoon, we headed to Baslow edge in search of a kid friendly walk, where we could let off some steam and take in the beautiful Peak District. Parking is a bit tricky, especially at peak times. A National Trust car park is available (free for membership holders) approx £4.50 all day. Or, you can park along the roadside, which is free.

National Trust
Curbar Edge Walk
Clodhall Lane
Hope Valley
S32 3YR

Path to the left from the road, leading to Baslow Edge

From the car park, cross over to the left side of the road, and find the path leading upwards. Follow the path straight to the edge, and you’re there!
No miles of walking for the little ones, you are instantly rewarded with large gritstone edges and cascading views over Baslow and beyond. Now you can pick and choose how far you would like to walk, depending on how long little legs will walk.

Views from Baslow Edge

Hairy Coos!

In the field to the left, just before you head to the edge, we found a herd of Highland Cattle. We drove all the way to Scotland to find a Hairy Coo (as they are affectionately known) to find NOT ONE, and yet there is a family of them, right here in the Peak District! They are very photogenic and will pose for you in all the right frames. Just take a look at these beauties!

The Higland cattle have had their fair share of struggles over the last few years, with complaints made towards the farmer over a dog issue. These cows are in their home, with their young, and they will protect them at any cost. As you would do with yours. So please, respect them and they will respect you.

The Eagle Stone

The route takes you along the edge, rock hopping and lava dodging as you go along. Make your way all the way down to the Wellingtons monument and back up again towards the Eagle stone. According to tradition, men had to prove their worth for marriage by climbing to the top. If anybody tags us in a picture on top of the stone, I’ll buy you a drink!

The Eagle Stone

The walk is easy to follow, straight down the edge and back up the footpath to the starting point. The edge itself is rocky and uneven but the footpath you walk back on is wheelchair and pushchair friendly. You could do a linear route or try and get as close to the edge as you can. Without getting yourself stuck!

Why Not Carry On To Curbar Edge?

If Baslow edge has tickled your fancy, and you want to carry on, Curbar Edge is across the road. A flatter expanse, Curbar Edge stretches for approximately 3k onto Froggatt Edge. A great walk, views for miles and lots of space for the kids to run around.

Curbar Edge to Froggatt Edge

Now, we met Sam from backpacksandbruises.com by the Coos who told us there were stags on the moors behind Curbar Edge. Finley’s ears pricked up so we had to go in search of them. She advised us that they were in the ditch area to the right of the Edge, towards Big Moor. We found the trig point on the map so headed for that, while keeping our eyes out for the stags.

The walk to the trig is along what we thought was a footpath, but turned out to be a boggy border of a field, worn in the grass. I have marked our route we took on the map image below.

Call Of The Stag

Up on the trig, the moors stretch out ahead. You can hear the call of the stags down below you. We strained our eyes as far as we could see, and spotted a lone stag, sitting in the heather. Again, being powerful creatures in their own surroundings, we are mindful not to disturb them. We don’t own high powered cameras so our pictures are nothing special, but Finley was happy to know a stag was there. The noises of them in their environment is nice to hear, and we had a guess as to what they were saying to one another!

These photos were taken earlier that morning by Phil, from Phil Sproson Photography. He runs Lets Go Peak District, a brilliant website for all things Peak District. From cafes, to cottages, hikes and businesses. Check it out here.

Back To The Car

Once the animal menagerie was over, we decided to head back to the car. From the trig facing the moor – head west. The path should unfold in front of you. Eventually, steps appear and a well marked path takes you back to the rear of the car park and a small coffee stop.

The smells of freshly brewed coffee coupled with the fresh air on your cheeks is an instant happiness injection.

I guarantee it.

Baslow Edge with Stags and Hairy Coos

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7 thoughts on “Baslow Edge with Stags and Hairy Coos

  1. How lovely to have such a beautiful spot to visit without little legs having to walk too far to reach it (and then being able to walk as little or as far as they are happy to!) Those Hairy Coos are beautiful. The Eagle stone looks like it would be quite a challenge to climb! Love the photos of the stag. #adventurecalling

  2. So this has has definitely been added to our list of places to visit. It looks amazing! And doable as a day trip from where we live too.

    The the Hairy Coos. Aw, they are so handsome.

    Looks like you had a brilliant day. Thanks for sharing your adventure with #AdventureCalling

  3. I love highland cows, so much character and so beautiful! Especially when they are as photogenic as the ones you met. This looks like a great walk. I fancy a Peak District trip soon so have just looked it up on OS website, thanks for the inspiration.
    I’m running late this month but the new #AdventureCalling will be open shortly.

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